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Do you put a comma before but or after but?

Do you put a comma before but or after but?

Often, a coordinating conjunction will connect two independent clauses — like the word “but.” But — and it’s a big but — your middle school teacher may have told you to always throw a comma before “but.” Don’t do that! You should only put a comma before “but” when connecting two independent clauses.

Where should the comma go in this sentence?

Commas (Eight Basic Uses)

  • USE A COMMA TO SEPARATE INDEPENDENT CLAUSES.
  • USE A COMMA AFTER AN INTRODUCTORY CLAUSE OR PHRASE.
  • USE A COMMA BETWEEN ALL ITEMS IN A SERIES.
  • USE COMMAS TO SET OFF NONRESTRICTIVE CLAUSES.
  • USE A COMMA TO SET OFF APPOSITIVES.
  • USE A COMMA TO INDICATE DIRECT ADDRESS.
  • Do I need a comma tool?

    The following are the different circumstances that require a comma be used. Use a comma before any coordinating conjunction that links two independent clauses. Use a comma after a dependent clause that starts a sentence. Use commas to offset appositives from the rest of the sentence.

    Does as well need a comma?

    The phrase as well as creates one of those situations where you may have to make a judgment call about comma usage. As a general rule, you don’t need a comma before as well as.

    Where does the comma go in a generator?

    Comma Check

    1. Use a comma before any coordinating conjunction that links two independent clauses.
    2. Use a comma after a dependent clause that starts a sentence.
    3. Use commas to offset appositives from the rest of the sentence.
    4. Use commas to separate items in a series.
    5. Use a comma after introductory adverbs.

    Can as well as replace and?

    “And” and “as well as” are not completely interchangeable. Using “and” to join two or more subjects will create a compound subject, and any verbs used with them should be plural. “As well as” doesn’t create a compound subject. The packaging, as well as the new concept, is going to be on your desk by tomorrow.

    Do you put a comma before or after but?

    Comma Before But. The sentence’s stated subject is I. It’s the subject of both verbs, the one before and the one after the but. The answer, therefore, is that no comma is needed before the but. The rule for but is the same as that for the other six coordinating conjunctions: and, for, or, nor, so, and yet.

    When to use a comma before and after an interrupter?

    The only time you need a comma after but is when it is immediately followed by an interrupter. An interrupter is a little word or phrase that interrupts a sentence to show emotion, tone, or emphasis. You should always use a comma before and after an interrupter.

    When to use a comma before or after a dependent clause?

    If the second part of a sentence is a dependent clause, there is no comma. This happens when you cannot make a logical sentence from the second clause. It is dependent on the first clause for its meaning. It is because there is no subject with a verb in the second clause. Look at these examples.

    Do you use a comma before but for the rain?

    Look at the words after but: for the rain. That phrase can’t stand by itself as a complete sentence, which means it’s a dependent clause. Therefore, you shouldn’t use a comma before but. I would go for a walk but for the rain.

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